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Date
01.04.19 - 03.04.19
St Anne's College, 56 Woodstock Road, Oxford OX2 6HS

A Biochemical Society Scientific Meeting


Introduction

BMPs (body morphogenetic proteins) are members of the TGF-β family, which bind to and activate multiple receptor serine/threonine kinases. The BMP pathway regulates tissue development and regeneration. It has become clear that BMP signalling can be co-opted for both tumour initiation and promotion. These effects are strongly related to its role in regulating stem cells. Like TGF-β, BMP signalling can act as a tumour suppressor or tumour promoter, dependent on the microenvironmental context. For example, overexpression of the antagonist, Gremlin1 can promote colorectal cancer (Davis et al., Nat Med 2015), while activating mutations in the BMP receptor kinase ALK2 drive a fatal paediatric glioma (Mackay et al., Cancer Cell 2017).

Aim

The aim of this conference is to explore the mechanisms of BMP signal transduction and to discuss how genetic and epigenetic alterations result in aberrant signalling and how this leads to cancer. Microenvironmental control of cancer cell function is a research area of intense interest and as a key mesenchymal-epithelial signalling pathway, BMP signalling is emerging as a key therapeutic target. We aim to discuss in detail how to manipulate the pathway, both positively and negatively with small molecules or biologics.

Further Information

For further information and to book, please visit the Biochemical Society website.

Continuing Professional Development (CPD)

This event is approved by the Royal Society of Biology for purposes of CPD and may be counted as 51 CPD credits.

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