You are here

South Wales

Gene Editing: What’s the point?

21 October 2016

Along with Cancer Research UK, the South Wales branch hosted a lecture delivered by Dr Maddy Young from the European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute, Cardiff University.

SW geneediting small

Dr Young provided a comprehensive overview about DNA, genes, and the processes of transcription and translation that sees the message contained within a genome interpreted by a cell and used for biological functions.

Dr Young went on to explain how gene mutations drive cancer formation and discussed the risk factors associated with cancer, before going on to discuss the concept of cancer stem cells and the implications this concept has for cancer therapies.

Finally Dr Young used examples of research undertaken at the European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute to demonstrate the “workflow” of research from basic research, examining the molecular causes of cancer and/or drug resistance to the application of this new knowledge in the development of novel therapies, finishing by showing how this can be translated into the clinic.

The event held to celebrate the work of the late Professor Alan Clarke, founder of the European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute. Feedback highlighted how participants had “gained an understanding of the basics of how cancer is formed”, “how lifestyle choices influence cancer risk” and “how Cardiff is contributing to new research in cancer biology”.

Cancer and stem cells: what’s all the fuss about?

5 September 2016

Along with Cancer Research UK, the South Wales branch hosted a lecture delivered by Dr Maddy Young from the European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute at Cardiff University.

Dr Young provided a comprehensive overview of DNA, genes, and the processes of transcription and translation that see the genome’s messages interpreted by a cell and used for biological functions.

Dr Young went on to explain how gene mutations drive cancer formation and discussed the risk factors associated with cancer, before going on to discuss the concept of cancer stem cells and the implications this concept has for cancer therapies. Finally Dr Young used examples of research undertaken at the European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute to demonstrate the “workflow” of research from basic research examining the molecular causes of cancer and/or drug resistance to the application of this new knowledge in the development of novel therapies, finishing by showing how this can be translated into the clinic.

The event held to celebrate the work of the late Professor Alan Clarke, founder of the European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute, was attended by circa 65 people and feedback highlighted how participants had “gained an understanding of the basics of how cancer is formed”, “how lifestyle choices influence cancer risk” and “how Cardiff is contributing to new research in cancer biology”. One participant commented “The lecture was pitched at a level I could understand and the speaker led us through complex ideas in a clear and engaging manner”.

Dr Karen Reed

 

Urey's geological thermometer

8 March 2016

Together with The Linnean Society, the South Wales branch held a celebratory lecture at the Wallace Lecture Theatre at Cardiff University, co-funded by the branch and the University's School of Earth and Ocean Sciences.

3 - Beatrix and Paul small

The event was chaired by Dr Beatrix Fahnert FRSB, chairperson of the South Wales branch committee.

Paul Pearson from Cardiff University gave a lecture titled Urey's geological thermometer: how oxygen isotopes revealed the history of global climate. He explained the work of the Nobel Prize winning physicist Harold Urey and his collaborators. In addition to his excellent presentation there were slides and interactive aids including a microscope set up to view the remnants of the small organisms (forams) to explain the work presented.

Feedback from attendees said the talk was "enjoyable, interesting and inspiring".

Dr Beatrix Fahnert FRSB

 

Synthetic Biology & Synthetic Life Panel Discussion

16 November 2015

Applications of new technologies and developments in context of synthetic biology and synthetic life can have a considerable impact on humans as well as the environment. Therefore, this proved to be an excellent topic for a rousing panel discussion.

The discussion covered many aspects of this fascinating field, including current foci and challenges of the topic, concepts of synthetic biology and synthetic life, as well as the technology and methodology involved. The panel also touched on the potential applications, and the societal and ethical implications of the field. Educational needs and future expectations were also addressed. Fundamentally, the discussion proved a broad introduction for many people to synthetic biology and the complexity of the term.

The panel for this discussion was comprised of a number of local academics from a range of scientific disciplines, including chemistry, biochemistry, and engineering. This diversity led to an interesting overview of the subject, which was chaired by Dr Beatrix Fahnert FRSB, chair of the South Wales branch.

As with all South Wales branch panel discussions, the event ended with a cheese and wine reception, which allowed for networking and further discussions on this fascinating subject to take place. 89 people attended and all left with "a better understanding of what synthetic biology is."

Dr Claire Price MRSB and Csaba Sárosi AMRSB

 

Demystifying DNA at the Cardiff Cancer Research Open Day

24 October 2015

Despite rain and the lure of a Rugby World Cup semi-final, our stand at the Cardiff Cancer Research Open Day attracted many visitors of all ages from Cardiff and further afield.

Lots of families with small children came to the stand, sparking further interest in biology. School children talked to us about future careers, and undergraduates deepened their subject understanding and explored potential careers. Twenty visitors extracted DNA from strawberries, fifteen studied their methylene-blue-stained cheek cells under the microscope, and far more engaged us in discussions.

Amazed by DNA becoming visible when extracted from strawberries, visitors literally had their eyes opened to the role of DNA in health and disease, all without expensive equipment and highly technical procedures performed by scientists.

Using an approach that can be easily repeated at home with washing up liquid, salt and alcohol truly demystified the enigma of DNA and lowered the perceived barriers of research.

Dr Beatrix Fahnert FRSB

 

Go Wild!

6 June 2015

The weather was not very kind as the South Wales branch headed to Pantside Community Woodland Park for this celebration of biodiversity, organised by Caerphilly County Borough.

As with all Go Wild events, it was intended to increase local people's awareness of the abundant wildlife on their doorstep. We had a rain shower before the 11:00 start and had to endure cold, gusting winds until the close at 16:00. Not what we expect in June!

There were several groups looking at different aspects of the local biodiversity. Branch members had a stand which concentrated on looking for animals in local soil samples. All the equipment used was either very cheap or free – even the microscopes were second-hand. The intention was to demonstrate that expensive items are not essential to do this sort of biology.

As expected, earthworms figured prominently but we were also able to look at millipedes, proturans and collembolans with the aid of the equipment. Both children and adults were fascinated by what they could see with the various types of lenses and microscopes. Hopefully, some of the schoolchildren were inspired to do some of their own microscope work in the future.

In spite of the weather, there were still a lot of visitors from the local community and from further afield.

John Vincent MRSB

 

Battling Infection

16 March 2015

Despite impressive scientific advances, infectious diseases remain one of the major threats to public health. As we have seen from recent events both locally and globally, there are still many controversial issues surrounding how we treat and prevent diseases ranging from measles to ebola. Therefore, the inaugural event of the recently established South Wales branch was an engaging audience-led panel discussion on battling infection.

The eminent panel was made up of a group of academic, medical and policy experts based in the South Wales region. The event was chaired by Dr Beatrix Fahnert FSB, chairperson of the South Wales branch committee.

Panel discussion cropped

Credit: Almero Barnard MSB

The superb discussion covered a number of areas:

How the over-prescription of antibiotics for viral infections are promoting antibiotic resistance leading to a call for consistency in prescriptions by GPs (there is a link between high number of antibiotics prescribed and the areas of greatest deprivation) and the need for enhanced levels of education on the topic amongst the general public.

The "anti-vaxxer" movement, which is of great relevance at the moment due to the recent outbreak of measles in California and the 2013 and 2014 outbreaks in Neath and Swansea.

How vaccines, the lost art of home remedies and exposure to a "good dose of dirt" for children could stimulate the immune system, alleviate symptoms and reduce the over reliance on the medical systems and pharmaceuticals.

Whilst the discussion was the main focus of the event, there were also displays and demonstrations showcasing research in the field.

Infection snooker cropped

Credit: Dr Karen Reed

A cheese and wine reception also allowed further discussions and networking to take place.
This was an excellent first event for the branch which attracted 177 people and provided a great opportunity to meet and listen to experts in the field at a free local event.

Dr Claire Price MSB